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Iran asks IAEA to avoid “attention to allegations”

US, WASHINGTON (NEWS OBSERVATORY) — Iran said on Wednesday that the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) should avoid “paying attention to the baseless allegations” after the agency raised questions about Iran’s nuclear program.

Last week, the agency accused Tehran of not allowing its inspectors to enter two sites in January.

Iranian Foreign Ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi said that the agency “must respect its entity and avoid paying attention to the allegations made by a person or regime,” according to the official IRNA news agency.

He added, “Iran has answered the agency’s questions, but these questions must be technical and legal, away from the politicization of some regimes.”

He pointed out that this issue “must remain in its technical and technical framework, and Iran cooperates best in this regard with the IAEA, and it is not obliged to answer the baseless allegations.”

The agency’s head, Rafael Grossi, called on Iran Monday to allow inspectors access to the sites, and said it had not participated in “substantive discussions” to provide clear answers to the agency’s questions.

Diplomats say the sites are linked to previous nuclear military programs for Iran, not to current activities.

But shedding light on Iran’s previous nuclear program to sign the 2015 agreement would exacerbate existing tensions.

Last week, Iran’s permanent ambassador to the United Nations in Vienna, Kazem Gharib Abadi, said that Tehran was “not obligated” to allow IAEA inspectors to enter sites in Iran when these requests were based on “fabricated information,” accusing the United States and Israel of seeking to put pressure on the agency.

However, Grossi denied the Iranian accusations, reiterating the independence of the International Atomic Energy Agency.

“This is agency information, the information can come from many sources, we have our own information, (…) we do not take any information literally,” he said.

Diplomats say the sites are linked to previous nuclear military programs for Iran, not to current activities.

But shedding light on Iran’s previous nuclear program to sign the 2015 agreement would exacerbate existing tensions.

Last week, Iran’s permanent ambassador to the United Nations in Vienna, Kazem Gharib Abadi, said that Tehran was “not obligated” to allow IAEA inspectors to enter sites in Iran when these requests were based on “fabricated information,” accusing the United States and Israel of seeking to put pressure on the agency.

However, Grossi denied the Iranian accusations, reiterating the independence of the International Atomic Energy Agency.

“This is agency information, information can come from many sources, we have our own information, (…) we never take any information literally,” he said.

The agreement reached in 2015, which stipulates restrictions on Iran’s nuclear program in exchange for the easing of sanctions imposed on it gradually, almost collapses after US President Donald Trump announced his country’s unilateral withdrawal from it in 2018.

The American position led Tehran to gradually liberalize, since last year, from the restrictions stipulated in the agreement.

Other countries participating in the nuclear deal, China, Britain, Russia, France and Germany, are meeting with Tehran to try to salvage the agreement.

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Article is written and prepared by our foreign editors from different countries around the world – material edited and published by News Observatory staff in our US newsroom.