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Lebanon: Israeli aircraft violate Beirut ‘most dangerous’ since 2006 war

UNITED STATES, WASHINGTON (OBSERVATORY) — Lebanese Defense Minister Elias Bou Saab said last month’s violation of Israeli planes marching into Beirut’s southern suburbs was the “most serious” since the June 2006 war.

He said “Bou Saab” that the breach “proves that the Israeli side adopted the rules of engagement with Lebanon.”

This came during a press conference on Thursday in the capital, Beirut, in which he presented the results of the investigation conducted by the Lebanese army on Israeli drones that targeted the southern suburb of Beirut on 25 August.

He pointed out, “Bou Saab” to 480 Israeli violations during the last two months, resolution 1701, and the most dangerous drones loaded with explosives, which passed over Beirut airport and endangered air navigation and went to the southern suburb.

Resolution 1701 was adopted unanimously by the UN Security Council on August 11, 2006, and calls for a complete cessation of hostilities between Lebanon and Israel following clashes between the two sides in July of the same year.

He added: “Several aircraft were in Lebanese airspace to control the two paths, and one of the two planes was carrying 4.5 kg of plastic explosives and the second has 4 arms and 8 engines.”

He pointed out that the second plane followed the first 42 minutes to the southern suburb.

The Lebanese Minister of Defense that the “drone” that fell in the suburb is a sophisticated military industry, the aim was to attack the city of Beirut.

He pointed out that it was launched from the airport “Homonim” in Israel and can be controlled via (aircraft) UAV airspace, stressing that “the breach was not only two paths, but next to them were small UAV aircraft in the air ready to run.”

He revealed that the first drones are equipped with an Israeli industry piece that transmits accurate information with high capacity and allows the march to be controlled by UAV.

“The aim of the drone was the attack, not just the shooting,” he said.

He said: “Israeli attacks have become different and another type and this is a serious change in the rules of engagement.”

He pointed out that “Lebanon today is in a state of self-defense, and this is a legitimate right contained in the government ministerial statement.”

Since August 25, Lebanon has been witnessing mounting security tensions, with two drones landing in the southern suburb of Beirut, followed by the following day, the explosions of three explosions in military centers of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (General Command), in the region of Kousia, Zahle district in the Bekaa.

Israel did not deny or confirm responsibility for what Lebanon witnessed, but Lebanese President Michel Aoun called the incident a “declaration of war” from Tel Aviv.

Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah vowed in late August to shoot down all Israeli drones in retaliation for the targeting of several positions in Syria and Lebanon.

In the past few days, southern Lebanon has witnessed military tension after Hezbollah targeted an Israeli military vehicle with anti-tank missiles in response to the killing of Hezbollah leaders in an Israeli raid in Syria and the downing of two drones in the southern suburbs.

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